Japan Society E-Library

Design and Crafts (see also 'Art', 'Ceramics')

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VII
Author: Koyama Noboru

Although Arthur Morrison (1863-1945) was primarily a writer and novelist, his collection of Japanese art would go on to form one of the core collections of Japanese prints and paintings at the British Museum. This essay details his career as a writer and connoisseur of Japanese art.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VI
Author: Rousmaniere, Nicole Coolidge

This essay compares and contrasts the parallel careers of two of the Victorian era's most influential collectors of Japanese art, Augustus Wollaston Franks (1826-97) and James Lord Bowes (1834-1899)

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume V
Author: Shaigiya-Abdelsamad, Yahya

The subject of this essay is Basil William Robinson, who became an expert on Japanese swords and helped to inspire interest in the Japanese sword and associated art and crafts.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VII
Author: Kornicki, Peter

Carmen Blacker (1924-2009) became one of Britain's most original and perceptive scholars of Japan, and this account charts the development of her love for the country and the impact this had upon her choice and pursuit of a career in academia.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VI
Author: Huberman, Toni

This essay offer an account of Charles Holme's (1848-1923) career as an art collecter and connoisseur of Japanese art, as well as his founding of The Studio - the first international arts magazine.

Book: Britain and Japan 1859-1991: Themes and Personalities
Author: Clark, John

This chapter details the life of Charles Wirgman (1835-1891) and his journalistic career in Japan, including as correspondant for the Illustrated London News and the founding of his satirical review the Japan Punch in Yokohoma. Wirgman was a key observer of the opening of the country, having arrived in 1861.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VIII
Author: Koyama Noboru

This portrait provides an account of the life of Ernest Hart (1835-1898), an ophthalmic surgeon, medical journalist, and avid connoisseur of Japanese art.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VIII
Author: Shaigiya-Abdelsamad, Yahya

This essay details the military career of Francis Festing (1912-76), along with his hobby as a connoisseur of Japanese swords and acts of reconcilliation.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VII
Author: Horner, Libby

This portrait of Frank Brangwyn (1867-1956) details his artistic career and interactions with the Japan Society as well as Japanese art and culture as a whole.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VIII
Author: Ono, Ayako

George Henry (1854-1934) and E.A. Hornel (1864-1933) developed a deep appreciation for Japanese art and were heavily involved in its promotion within European artistic circles. This portrait provides an account of their careers within the context of Scotland's involvement in the modernisation of Japan.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VI
Author: Koyama Noboru

This essay provides an account of Japanese tattooists interactions with the British Royal Family during the Meiji period.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume IV
Author: Ashmore, Sonia

Lasenby Liberty (1843-1917) presided over his company at a time when Japanese luxury goods were hugely popular in Britain. This essay considers Liberty in relation to japonsime, as well as his visits to Japan to oversee business.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume V
Author: Numata Hideko

This essay recounts Marcus Bourne Huish's (1843-1921) important role in the development of Anglo-Japanese relations, especially through his efforts to introduce Japanese art to British people.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VIII
Author: Maezaki Shinya

This portrait provides an account of the exchange of skills in the world of ceramics and pottery between Japan and Britain through Matsubayashi Tsurunosuke (1894-1932) and his visit to Britain from 1922-1924, as well as his wider introduction of Japanese culture to Britain.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VIII
Author: Ashmore, Sonia

Mortimer Menpes (1835-1938) was fully immersed in fin de siècle Japonisme and travelled to Japan twice. This portrait examines the influence of Japan on his artistic career.

Book: Japan Experiences - Fifty Years, One Hundred Views: Post-War Japan Through British Eyes
Author: Swan, Peter

Peter Swan went to Japan in 1953 to study Chinese painting, and during his time there covered many facets of Japanese art. Here he gives an account of his visit.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VII
Author: Raggett, Jill

This portait outlines the major figures of Japanese garden design in Britain, their separate contributions to the medium, and their impact upon the understanding of other aspects of Japanese culture in Britain. Includes thoughts from Eida Saburo, Suzuki Jiju, Honda Taki, and Kusumoto Seyemon.

Book: British Envoys in Japan 1859-1972
Author: Cortazzi, Hugh

A reassessment of the career of Sir Rutherford Alcock (1809-1897), the first British Minister to Japan from 1859-64.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VII
Author: Basham, Anna

This essay details Britain's changing attitudes towards Japanese Architecture between 1862 and 1919, including thoughts from Rutherford Alcock, James Jackson Jarves, E.W. Godwin, Josiah Conder, Christopher Dresser, Edward S. Morse, Charles Rennie Mackintosh and William Morris.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume IX
Author: Maclean, Nicolas

The Great Japan Exhibition (1981-82) opened many eyes to some of the great achievements of Japanese art and culture. This essay details what at the time was the most comprehensive exhibition ever devoted to its subject, even in Japan itself.

Book: Britain and Japan 1859-1991: Themes and Personalities
Author: Cortazzi, Hugh

This volume was published on the occasion of the centenary of the Japan Society, and in this chapter Sir Hugh Cortazzi chronicles its hundred year history, from its founding at the 1891 Congress of Orientalists, via the two world wars and a number of royal visits, through to the 1991 Japan Festival and an assessment of the Society's then challenging state of affairs.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume I
Author: Cortazzi, Hugh

This essay considers the friendship between Bernard Leach and Yanagi Sōetsu (1889-1961), as well as their relationship to the Minegi movement.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VII
Author: Garner, Shaun

Sir Merton (1835-1921) and Lady Russell-Cotes (1835-1920) were passionate about Japan, bringing over a hundred cases of souvenirs back to England following their first visit to the country. This essay details their passion as it manifested itself in collecting Japanese objects and promoting Japanese culture.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VIII
Author: Cortazzi, Hugh

Tomimoto Kenkichi (1886-1963) was one of Japan's leading artists of the twentieth century. This portrait examines both his skill with ceramics and friendship with the great British potter Bernard Leach.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VII
Author: Horner, Libby

This essay details Urushiba Mokuchū's (1889-1953) life and career in Britain as a print artist, including his close collaboration with Frank Brangwyn.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VIII
Author: Kubota Noriko

This essay makes the case for the influence of Japonisme in the writing career of Virginia Woolf (1892-1941).

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VII
Author: Basham, Anna

Wells Coates (1895-1958) was an eminent figure in the British Modern Movement, and an avant-garde architect-designer who made frequent reference to his upbringing in Japan.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume V
Author: Rawlins, John

This portrait details William Anderson's (1842-1900) distinguished medical career in Japan and Britain, as well as his scholarly efforts as a collector and connoisseur of Japanese art.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VIII
Author: Bincsik, Monika

This essay analyses and details the significance and extent of the Sutherland collection of Japanese lacquer art.

Book: Biographical Portraits Volume VIII
Author: Monden, Sonoko

Although Yamanaka and Company, run by Yamanaka Sadajirō (1866-1936), was only active in London for half a century, it served as a bridge between Japan and British communities, and contributed to the collecting and study of Japanese art in Britan.

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